Additional Info

  • Intro Shortcode
    Benchmarks

Benchmarks come in a number of different forms whether it be a time trial within a workout, a personal best for a specific distance, or on a bigger scale, perhaps a person for comparison as for what you’d like to become as an athlete. 

Back when I was racing Ironman, there was a guy I knew who seemed almost impossible to beat.  He’s a really strong swimmer, biker, and runner.  Back then, the only place where I felt like I could compete with him was on the run in an Ironman.  Despite our differences, I used him as a benchmark for what I wanted to be.  It wasn’t completely unobtainable but it was certainly a stretch goal by any imagination.

Additional Info

  • Intro Shortcode
    Bullseye!

Sometimes we get apprehensive about big training days or race days.  This is fairly common and I think the obvious reason is that we don’t want to fail.  Or more to the point, what we perceive as failure.  See my previous post on failure.

With regard to the big training days, we’re testing race day execution.  If you don’t want to go into the race blindly, I think it’s a good idea to get as much out of them as possible.  If something goes wrong, we can tweak the execution and get it dialed in for race day.  On race day, execution is based on our historical data and testing, and you go for it. 

Additional Info

  • Intro Shortcode
    Vince - TRT 100

If you’re not failing, you’re not trying hard enough.  You have to put yourself out there, go for the win, and see where things end up.  Most of the time, you finish somewhere in between the two ends.  On the extremely rare occasions, you end up winning.  And then there are the days when it just goes horribly wrong.  I can count those days on one hand but they’ve left a permanent mark on my soul.

Additional Info

  • Intro Shortcode
    Javelina

What’s my limiter?  That’s a question I ask myself from time to time.

If you’re starting out with a new distance, the mileage alone might be a limiter and working towards covering that distance as a whole or in pieces could be something you’d work on.  But at a certain point, the distance is no longer an obstacle and your limiter might be speed. 

With trail running, there’s an attraction to running long but if you caught up in the mystique of distance, you’ll end up slower.  Initially, it’s almost inevitable – distance is the limiter, you’ll slow down to run farther and you lose your speed in the process.  If you get caught in this track, you’ll continue to lose your speed.  The trick is to recognize when you’ve overcome the distance problem and then to move on to the next limiter.

Additional Info

  • Intro Shortcode
    Basic Training

When you go through basic military training, they teach you rules for jobs you may never hold.  For example -- we were taught rules for guarding a door and the rules were explained as follows:

1.  No person shall enter without showing proper identification.
2.  See Rule #1.

Quite a few people failed this duty.  It seems simple enough but when I rotated into the position of door guard, I understood the challenge.  Picture this -- I've had 4 hours of sleep in the last 48 hours, I'm guarding the door and it's probably around midnight.  My drill sergeant approaches the door and he tells me to let him in.  I ask for his identification and he claims he's left it at home.  I refuse to let him in, he becomes angry and I fuel his anger by repeatedly asking for his identification.  He screams at me and he demands entry.  I refuse.  He continues screaming, he threatens me and then he storms off.  Despite the rules, I'm concerned I've made a mistake but I haven't made a mistake.  I followed the rules, I passed the test.